The Americans wished to give the title of Highness to General Washington, a President of the Congress, but the hero rejected the offer, saying, that the title he already held, was fully equal to his ambition. Citation: Glasgow Advertiser (Glasgow, United Kingdom), 27 November 1789, available at the Scissors and Paste Database, http://www.scissorsandpaste.net/385.

Extract of a letter from an Englishman, dated Lima, Septemper 10, 1821 “Lima is what an Englishman would call a dirty colonial town; 6000 inhabitants is the outside of its population; the whites are about 1200 Europeans, and not as many born in the country; the rest are blacks and mulattoes. Of the mulattoes there …

Richmond, January 28. Extract of a letter from a Gentleman now residing at Quebec, to his Correspondent in this City, dated Jan. 9, 1972 Our humanity was deeply affected by the dreadful carnage made by the Indians. You may be assured that the number of Indians did not exceed 1000, and that nothing saved General …

In answer to the remarks which appeared in our paper on Monday last, respecting emigration to America, and to the statements there given of the disadvantages which emigrants from this country might expect to meet with, we have received a very abusive letter from an anonymous correspondent, who appears very angry, and, like most other …

Extract of a letter from William Hunt, esq.” To H. Hunt, esq. “Washington Hotel, New Orleans, Dec. 25. 1818. ” My Dear Brother – We arrived safe in the mouth of the Mississippi on the 10th of this month, after a voyage of 82 days from Gravesend. Your son and myself are in excellent health, …

Our paper of Thursday last contained a general view of some of the most popular publications on the subject of emigration, and we shall now endeavour briefly to make an estimate of the good and evil which is likely to befall those who embark in this hazardous adventure. There is one important fact which we …

Irish Emigrants. New York, Nov. 27. Nothing scarcely can be conceived more distressing than the situation of an unfriended stranger arrived here, from across the Atlantic, without the means of helping himself, and without even enough of acquaintance with the men and things about him to enable him to judge what path he should take …

CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. The following account of the inhabitants of this settlement is given by a late traveller. The education of youth has hitherto been very much neglected: the government never hit upon any successful plan for the establishment of public schools; and the individual had no other ambition but that of qualifying his …

Extract of a letter from India, by the Dublin East Indiaman, to Mr. William Jones We left Patia Dec. 15, 1789, and went to Decca, and arrived there after a passage of 16 days. Just as we arrived there was a famine, and it was really a shocking sight to behold; you could not move …

Extract of a letter form Philadelphia, dated 25th May, 1789. “I have travelled through several of the States and see no appearance of the poverty which you hear so much boast of in Britain–every where I meet rather with extravagance. Indeed they procure too easily to be frugal in their out-givings. All the manufactured goods …